Belfast Watch Sale

Now, why would someone give thousands of pounds for a luxury watch in Belfast? Is this a practical choice? Actually, for those who can afford to do buy one, money and practicality are not key issues. After all, you are not only concerned about time, but about what the watch represents. A luxury watch speaks about prestige and an attitude that says, “Only the best will do!” When you also consider the artistry and workmanship that goes into making a Belfast Swiss luxury watch, you will say it is well worth the price. Also, these watches are made with the best materials – gold, diamonds and other precious metals and gems. Also, think about the attention to detail and level of precision that went into the crafting of such a watch.

Luxury Watch Brands

Luxury Watches - Questions to Ask When Buying One

Now, when buying a watch in Belfast, here are some questions to ask:

– What’s my style? Are you the sporty type? Do you prefer elegant and classic designs or would you rather have something innovative and eye-catching?

– What’s the brand? The brand not only gives you insight on the level of prestige it can bring to you but will give you an idea of the craftsmanship that went into the making of the watch.

– What’s my budget? Of course, this question does not apply for those who can afford to spend the big bucks. But you still have to look into how much you are willing to spend for a watch.

– Is the Belfast watch dealer authorised and reputable? Can they provide a serial number for the watch, as well as a warranty? Does the dealer have valid contact numbers?

– Are there customs issues I should consider? Are there other costs I should think of? When buying online, there may be hidden costs, such as the cost to deliver it to your home. Customs can tack on 10% to something as much as 20% of the value of the watch, depending on your country of residence.

– Is the website secure? If you’re planning to buy the watch online, check to see the security and privacy features of the website to ensure that there is no possibility of identity or information theft.

Luxury Watches - What You Need to Know

Leather Strap Watches

Buying a luxury watch is usually a decision that you don’t make at a spur of the moment. To get the watch that is right for you, be sure to give it some thought and ask questions (like the ones listed above) to help you make an informed decision.

Luxury Watches - What You Need to Know

Thomas Russell 's name is synonymous with the Lancashire watch making industry and he is an icon for watch purists and enthusiasts around the world. But how he came to become a watchmaker and why Lancashire played such an important role in the watchmaking industry is a fascinating story.

In the 17th century farmers and agricultural workers who needed to supplement their income during the winter months undertook much of the work of watchmaking. In and around Lancashire this was particularly important and the proximity of metalworking, the availability of fine metal tools and the port of Liverpool aided the growth of the industry. By the 18th century watch parts were being sub-contracted to small farms and cottages throughout the region.

Another factor in the growth of this cottage industry were the significant lower overheads that the farmers enjoyed as part-time workers in their own homes. Elsewhere wages were the largest contributor to the total cost of watch manufacturing with the cost of raw materials, apart from gold and silver used in the making of expensive cases, relatively small.

One commentator notes that, "From Prescott to Liverpool, eight miles as the crow flies, the countryside was dotted with the cottages of spring makers, wheel cutters, chain makers, case makers, dial makers - every speciality that went into the making of a watch." By the end of the 18th century between 150,000 and 200,000 watches a year were being produced by this system, satisfying the national need for accurate timekeeping as the industrial revolution took hold.

The Lancashire sub-contracting system allowed the production of watch movements at such low prices that by the end of the 18th century, the Lancashire manufacturers were supplying most of the great watch firms in London, Coventry and Liverpool. All that these firms needed to do was to make or source their own case and dial, and then assemble the watch.

Thomas Russell joined this hive of activity in 1848 when he moved his business as a watch manufacturer to Slater Street in Liverpool. The city was a major seafaring port and the manufacture of ships' clocks and chronometers became an important revenue stream for the business.

Thomas Russell's father, also named Thomas Russell (1780-1830), the founder of this watchmaking dynasty, was born in Eskdale a small village in Cumberland. He served his time in watchmaking in New St. Broughton-in-Furness Lancashire under William Bellman, he then served his journeyman time with William Wakefield in Market St Lancaster where he later started a business of his own in the same street.

He had two sons; one named Thomas was married to Mary in 1831. They also had two sons, Thomas Robert (1833-1894) born in Lancaster and Alfred Holgate Russell (1840-1893). In about 1840 the family moved to Halifax setting up a watchmaking business in Lord St. It was here that Alfred was born.

By 1848 the family had moved once more and records show that Thomas Russell was a watch manufacturer with premises at 20 or 22 Slater Street, Liverpool and later at number 32 in the same street. It was here that Thomas Russell became arguably Liverpool 's finest watchmaker and the business produced quality watches and clocks, including the celebrated Russell Hunter pocket watch. Thomas Senior and his oldest son Thomas Robert were granted a Royal Warrant by Queen Victoria indicating their rapid progress in watch manufacturing.

Around 1859, Thomas handed over control of the business to his sons Thomas Robert and Alfred Holgate and the company changed its name to Thomas Russell & Son. Following Thomas Russell's death in 1867 the business was divided into two; the trade side continued under the same name and was run by Alfred and Thomas ran Russells Limited. The retail business became importers of Swiss watches and music boxes.

By 1877 the company had moved the business once more, this time to Cathedral Works, 12 Church Street, Liverpool, with additional offices at Piccadilly in London and Toronto, Canada. It was now known as the Russell Watch and Chronometer Manufactory and was listed in 1880 as "watch and chronometer manufacturers and machine made keyless lever and jewellery merchants" and additionally, "by Appointment to Her Majesty the Queen and HRM the Duke of Edinburgh and the Admiralty".

After Queen Victoria's death, Thomas Russell still signed their watches "Makers to Queen Victoria" even though officially the warrant had ceased with the Queens death. This was tolerated for a time before they removed this from their watches.

Following the deaths of Thomas Robert and Alfred Holgate, Alfred's son Bernard Holgate Russell and his cousin Thos Townsend Russell took over the company and the name of the business was changed in 1894 to Russells Limited. From this date it appears that they continued as retail jewellers with several branches in Liverpool and, by the early 1900's, Manchester and Llandudno as well.

Bernard married and had a son Thomas Graham (1906-1999). In 1915 Bernard and Thos Townsend Russell invited Joseph Wright to become a fellow director of Thos Russell & Son. Joseph had extensive trade knowledge, travelled extensively and had business contacts in Switzerland and working experience with the famous American Illinois Watch Case Co.

The sons of these directors all seemed to have worked in and run the business in later years. During WW2 Joseph Wright kept the firm going despite wartime shortages of materials and men until the sons returned from the war. In about 1994 both the retail Liverpool Russells Ltd and the workshops and offices at 12 Church Street closed their doors for the last time.

Titanium Watches

Luxury watches are a thing of the future, a timeless product everyone wants to own. They are a sign of prestige and class, as well as of timeless fashion sense. There are numerous brand names out there, in a range of styles and prices to suit your tastes and budget.

The watch case houses the watch and all its parts. Sometimes made of stainless steel, some cheaper materials include plastic, while gold and platinum are more expensive. The case back protects the watch's inner materials and must be removed to replace the batteries and make repairs. It sometimes is a clear crystal.

The crystal is the "glass" through which you can view the watch. This can be made of plastic or glass.

The bezel is the outer ring of the watch face, and holds the crystal in place.

The the crown is the knob you use to set the time or wind the watch up. It is also called a stem or pin.

The display indicates the time, either by hands or numerals. Some of the newer models display other information as well.

The dial indicates the "face", a metal plate you view your watch through and can have various kinds of displays.

A bracelet usually denotes metal, while a strap denotes leather, animal hide, rubber or plastic.

The the clasp is the metal piece holding the band in place.

The movement indicates how the watch works inside and it's functions.

Water resistance indicates how much water pressure a watch can resist.

Watch maintenance is roughly akin to car maintenance. If you regularly maintain and repair your watch, you will be able to avoid costly repairs or having to replace it altogether. Here is a brief guide to watching maintenance.

Clean and service your timepiece every two years to ensure it stays trouble-free. Even quartz watches should be cleaned as they are also susceptible to small particles that can result in damage. Replace all batteries and seals at the time of maintenance. Rust is a small watch's enemy. Rinse it under fresh water after it's exposed to saltwater. Do not subject your water-resistant watch to heat or pressure. Remove watch before getting into any hot showers, baths, saunas or hot tubs, as these high heats can damage them. Get your watch immediately serviced if any moisture gets inside the crystal.

Diving watches need regular servicing, too, despite their high water resistance. Protect leather bands from water and perfumes, especially salt water.

When changing the date on your watch, do not change it within three hours of midnight, as at this time the watches date change is being carried out internally.

These are just a few tips to help with regular maintenance of your special watches and keep it looking good for years to come.

Thomas Russell & The Early English Watchmaking Industry

It's difficult to determine which watch brand is best since most current watchmakers create truly unique timepieces through complex processes and impressive designs.

This the guide is here to explain a bit about the most important brands and try to set you in the right direction if you're shopping for a luxury watch.

Some well-known brands are considered the best due to intense advertising, so they raised the bar pretty high for their competition.

If you're thinking about starting a watch collection, or just get a truly remarkable timepiece for yourself or as a gift to someone close to you, keep on reading since there are a few things to learn in order to become a watch connoisseur.

When you're done with this guide, then the real research work starts since you'll need to figure out what type of watch you want and what sort of features it should carry, so it best complements who you are and your looks.

Timepieces can be categorized by many things, starting from their unique designs, the dial shape and the watch crystal to the way they work and the features they provide. Another factor to take into account would be their popularity.

Brands popularity indicates superiority among the major competitors in the watch market.

Due to advertising and media, most people know of only overly advertised brands as the best of the best when it comes to watches. They are totally oblivious to the fact that other top brands exist which produce equal if not superior watches when compared to the ones they know of.

The the average individual can recognise a few watch brands they've seen over and over advertised on television and in magazines and can recognise them in order of ascending price tag as Timex, Casio, Seiko or Tag watches.

Most people know only of a few brands from the ones that exist, and thanks to media advertising, they might not be aware of truly superior brands that find their way in some people's collections.

They might not even know what products brands like Alain Silberstein, Audemars Piguet, Blancpain, Chopard, Fortis, Franck Mueller, IWC, Jaeger-Le Coultre, Patek Phillipe, and Ulysse Nardin actually make if you were not to tell them.

Top brands like Sony or Bose are known globally and that's what makes them be at the top of the market choice for average people.

While these brands are known for top quality, they might not always be the best choice.

If you want to impress average people, you will buy brands that are easily recognizable, even for hefty amounts of money and still get a decent watch that keeps time like a 25$ one with no extra features.

Knowledgeable people and aficionados will buy something that impresses them in the first place. Second-hand recognition is not that important when shopping for a premium watch.

Female Watches

As we covered in part one of this article series, many luxury watch manufacturers have rules prohibiting their authorized dealers from selling their products online. Is this rule fair and reasonable? As you may have guessed, the opinion of this author is that this rule is NOT fair. Why? Let's consider a few reasons:

1) The internet -- the future is now.
The internet has become a virtual world encompassing almost all aspects of life; after all, it is known as the "information superhighway" right? People use the internet for social networking, shopping, medical advice, car repair and home improvement info, and much much more. Without the internet, chances are that many, if not most of us would not even know what luxury watch manufacturers exist. What's the point? When it comes to internet sales, many manufacturers need to "get with it." By using authorized online dealers to sell their products, more people would be aware of those products. This leads to the next point:

2) Accessibility to the consumer.
Right now, if I want to shop for many luxury watches from an "authorized" dealer, I have to travel at least 50 miles from where I live and in order to shop some of the more exclusive brands, I'd have to travel some 230 miles to Chicago, Illinois. So, my choice is either to buy from an unauthorized source OR travel significant distance. Some may say,"if you've got the money to buy a luxury watch, travel is no big deal for you." Okay, that may be true enough but what if the closest dealer still doesn't have the watch you want? The internet can allow for much greater choices than one local dealer.

3) Fakes -- fear vs. reality.
One of the reasons watch manufacturers say you shouldn't buy online is because you might unintentionally buy a fake. The concept is that if you buy a watch costing thousands of dollars without seeing it first you might get taken. What's the reality? Some fakes are so well made that you wouldn't know by looking at it that it is a fake until an expert tells you so. The consumer's only hope is to trust the manufacturer to direct direct him to a legitimate dealer and then trust the dealer to sell him a real watch. Why not do the same online?

4) Used market.
There is no authorized way for watch buyers to buy used watches and conversely for people to sell them. As a result, companies that deal in used watches are forced to warranty the products themselves. Consider the automobile market: if you buy a used car within the manufacturer's warranty period, the manufacturer's warranty still carries over to the new owner. Since cars cost tens of thousands of dollars, shouldn't a watch costing thousands also have the same policy?

I hope that after considering these points, you'll support the online watch dealers that have the watch you want to buy. In our next article, we'll consider the perils of buying watches online. Thanks for reading!

Luxury Watches - Why You Should Buy Your Next One Online - Part Two

Thomas Russell 's name is synonymous with the Lancashire watch making industry and he is an icon for watch purists and enthusiasts around the world. But how he came to become a watchmaker and why Lancashire played such an important role in the watchmaking industry is a fascinating story.

In the 17th century farmers and agricultural workers who needed to supplement their income during the winter months undertook much of the work of watchmaking. In and around Lancashire this was particularly important and the proximity of metalworking, the availability of fine metal tools and the port of Liverpool aided the growth of the industry. By the 18th century watch parts were being sub-contracted to small farms and cottages throughout the region.

Another factor in the growth of this cottage industry were the significant lower overheads that the farmers enjoyed as part-time workers in their own homes. Elsewhere wages were the largest contributor to the total cost of watch manufacturing with the cost of raw materials, apart from gold and silver used in the making of expensive cases, relatively small.

One commentator notes that, "From Prescott to Liverpool, eight miles as the crow flies, the countryside was dotted with the cottages of spring makers, wheel cutters, chain makers, case makers, dial makers - every speciality that went into the making of a watch." By the end of the 18th century between 150,000 and 200,000 watches a year were being produced by this system, satisfying the national need for accurate timekeeping as the industrial revolution took hold.

The Lancashire sub-contracting system allowed the production of watch movements at such low prices that by the end of the 18th century, the Lancashire manufacturers were supplying most of the great watch firms in London, Coventry and Liverpool. All that these firms needed to do was to make or source their own case and dial, and then assemble the watch.

Thomas Russell joined this hive of activity in 1848 when he moved his business as a watch manufacturer to Slater Street in Liverpool. The city was a major seafaring port and the manufacture of ships' clocks and chronometers became an important revenue stream for the business.

Thomas Russell's father, also named Thomas Russell (1780-1830), the founder of this watchmaking dynasty, was born in Eskdale a small village in Cumberland. He served his time in watchmaking in New St. Broughton-in-Furness Lancashire under William Bellman, he then served his journeyman time with William Wakefield in Market St Lancaster where he later started a business of his own in the same street.

He had two sons; one named Thomas was married to Mary in 1831. They also had two sons, Thomas Robert (1833-1894) born in Lancaster and Alfred Holgate Russell (1840-1893). In about 1840 the family moved to Halifax setting up a watchmaking business in Lord St. It was here that Alfred was born.

By 1848 the family had moved once more and records show that Thomas Russell was a watch manufacturer with premises at 20 or 22 Slater Street, Liverpool and later at number 32 in the same street. It was here that Thomas Russell became arguably Liverpool 's finest watchmaker and the business produced quality watches and clocks, including the celebrated Russell Hunter pocket watch. Thomas Senior and his oldest son Thomas Robert were granted a Royal Warrant by Queen Victoria indicating their rapid progress in watch manufacturing.

Around 1859, Thomas handed over control of the business to his sons Thomas Robert and Alfred Holgate and the company changed its name to Thomas Russell & Son. Following Thomas Russell's death in 1867 the business was divided into two; the trade side continued under the same name and was run by Alfred and Thomas ran Russells Limited. The retail business became importers of Swiss watches and music boxes.

By 1877 the company had moved the business once more, this time to Cathedral Works, 12 Church Street, Liverpool, with additional offices at Piccadilly in London and Toronto, Canada. It was now known as the Russell Watch and Chronometer Manufactory and was listed in 1880 as "watch and chronometer manufacturers and machine made keyless lever and jewellery merchants" and additionally, "by Appointment to Her Majesty the Queen and HRM the Duke of Edinburgh and the Admiralty".

After Queen Victoria's death, Thomas Russell still signed their watches "Makers to Queen Victoria" even though officially the warrant had ceased with the Queens death. This was tolerated for a time before they removed this from their watches.

Following the deaths of Thomas Robert and Alfred Holgate, Alfred's son Bernard Holgate Russell and his cousin Thos Townsend Russell took over the company and the name of the business was changed in 1894 to Russells Limited. From this date it appears that they continued as retail jewellers with several branches in Liverpool and, by the early 1900's, Manchester and Llandudno as well.

Bernard married and had a son Thomas Graham (1906-1999). In 1915 Bernard and Thos Townsend Russell invited Joseph Wright to become a fellow director of Thos Russell & Son. Joseph had extensive trade knowledge, travelled extensively and had business contacts in Switzerland and working experience with the famous American Illinois Watch Case Co.

The sons of these directors all seemed to have worked in and run the business in later years. During WW2 Joseph Wright kept the firm going despite wartime shortages of materials and men until the sons returned from the war. In about 1994 both the retail Liverpool Russells Ltd and the workshops and offices at 12 Church Street closed their doors for the last time.


UK